Shield’s Tavern in Colonial Williamsburg, VA – Gluten free review

So first, I have to apologize as this is not up to the level of my normal review and it’s devoid of pictures, but I wanted to share the content nonetheless, in case it could help some of you.  I was in Williamsburg recently for work and the group chose Shield’s Tavern for our working dinner. It was very difficult to even find out if there were gluten free foods available, as the restaurant is run by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, so not quite like a normal restaurant.Colonial Williamsburg common license

Shield’s Tavern’s website (https://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/eat/shields) makes no reference to gluten free, but an article on them says gluten free is available. So, after calling the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, they said there is gluten free available, but couldn’t give me more information about which dishes were gluten free and if they had nuts or pork, so I had to nervously go to dinner without a clue!

Fortunately, when I got to the actual restaurant, they were able to inform me that all the entrees could be done gluten free. I see one lists couscous, so I hope they know to replace that with rice. I picked what the safest option seemed to be, the Molasses Grilled Flank Steak.  It’s listed as “Grilled Flank Steak with Molasses, Garlic and Ginger Roasted Fingerling Potatoes, and Three Sister Vegetables.” I’m happy to report I did not get sick (and I’m extremely sensitive) so I would consider this place safe, but the dish did not have a lot of flavor so I wouldn’t be in a hurry to return. I also verified it was also pork and peanut free, especially because seeing “West African” flavorings can sometimes indicate peanut or peanut butter, so as always, be sure to check if you dine there with whatever meal you’d like to order.

The tavern is as it was originally built in the 1700s, so there are candles (now electric and wick), but not wired lighting and their chairs are very hard and uncomfortable, in keeping with what was available in that era. It’s rather crowded, but a unique experience for those interested in the colonial era. Musicians played in front of the restaurant on the street and occasionally came tableside to play a fife or stringed instrument that resembled a cross between a mini-harp and a guitar.

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